Tutorial Thursday: Embroidered Notebook ♥

Embroidered-Raindrop-Notebook

Hi guys! I’m excited to be here today to share a simple embroidery DIY for Alice’s blog.

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Here’s what you will need to get started:

• A moleskin notebook

• Embroidery thread and needle

• Pencil

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On the inside cover of your notebook, sketch out your design using a pencil. I went for a simple raindrop.

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Using your needle, make holes a long the lines of your design, around 0.5cm apart.

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Take a length of embroidery thread (I used all 6 strands) and sew around your pre punched holes using a backstitch. This video shows you how to make the stitches.

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Once you have sewn around your design, fasten off with a knot on the inside cover of the notebook. Snip the ends of the thread and you’re done!

Embroidered-Raindrop-Notebook-Final

What I love about this DIY is you can change the design and colours to suit you. You could try a monogrammed notebook or flowers perhaps!

Thanks again to Alice for having me on her blog today!

Claire x

I have loved having Claireabellemakes with us this week. Her work is so delicate and gorgeous to look at. I do hope you will all continue to follow her work and do check out the interview she did with us on Tuesday. Coming up next week we have Lindsey Portas, who I am VERY excited about!!

Thank you Claire and HAPPY THURSDAY!

Introducing: Claire ♥

Claireabellemakes

Good Morning! Please forgive me for my LONG absence! I have been a busy little bee, however I am now, back! This week we have a lovely guest with us and I can’t wait to share her tutorial with you this upcoming Thursday! I won’t keep you waiting any longer (I feel I’ve kept you waiting long enough these past few weeks!)
So, lets welcome Claire…

Tell us a little bit about yourself…

I’m Claire aka Claireabellemakes and I live in Cambridge, UK. I spend my life playing Scrabble, riding bicycles and making jewellery and accessories, as well as crocheting and knitting. I have a huge stationery obsession and adore sending snail mail. I am also a crazy cat lady which I’m really not ashamed of.

How would you explain your style and and what is your work process?

Ultimately I like to make things that look nice! I tend to stick with pastel colours when working with fabric and when I make accessories, I prefer items that can be worn every day. Most of my projects begin with a notebook sketch or plan, and I often try multiple versions of projects until I get it just right. My preferred work space is definitely my craft studio space in my home, but I often meet friends for crochet and tea afternoons too.

Bicycle-Accessories

Where did your love of handmade begin for you? Do you have any upcoming projects?

My grandmother taught me to knit as a child and I would spend hours making garter stitch scarves with tons of dropped stitches! I’ve always been ‘crafty’ but over the last 3 years my love of handmade has really grown. There are so many talented makers out there, it is hard not to be inspired to craft yourself. My current projects include some crochet blankets and new Scrabble accessories for my Etsy store. I am very tempted to start another crochet jumper too as you can’t beat a handmade garment.

For you, what is the best part of working in the craft industry?

In a personal sense, it’s the community and how supportive everyone is. There is a great feeling of encouragement and such a willingness to help others. I’ve always been a people person and it makes me happy that there are so many people enjoying craft. Making something with your own hands is a great feeling and being able to share that with others is really positive. In a business sense, I adore the interaction with customers to create gifts and custom orders. I recently made a Scrabble Wall Art as a groom’s gift to his bride and it was such a special feeling to be part of their day.

Scrabble-Wall-Art-Dream-Believe-Achieve

You’ve done a lot of work with many people in this industry, such as Make and Craft Magazine. Are there any you dream of working or collaborating with?

Over the last year I have worked with a publisher to contribute to some craft books alongside other makers. One day I would love to work with a publisher in creating my own title, but I know there is a lot to learn first! I think every maker would love to be featured in Mollie Make magazine too, it’s just such an inspiring publication!

And finally, what advice would you give to someone branching out in the handmade world?

Be brave and push yourself. Keep your eyes open for opportunities. I have done things I never thought I would be capable of and I’m pleased I did! I would also recommend being as organised as you can possibly be if you are planning to make as a business. I’m a big fan of my Filofax for organising and planning and I think I’d be lost without it.

Please join Claire on Thursday, where she will be sharing with us a tutorial, involving paper & embroidery! Two lovely handmade elements! In the mean time, do check out Claires work on her blog, instagram, pinterest, twitter and her etsy!

Introducing: Kate Marsden ♥

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Joining us today, is Kate Marsden. A textile designer and fibre artist. I stumbled across her blog and instantly wanted to know more! I love textile art and SO wish I could do it myself.
I hope you enjoy her interview with us this week and like me, can’t wait for her new designs and collections!

✎ Tell us a little bit about yourself…

I’m a textile designer based in far South London. My designs are inspired by life in the city and in particular mid-century architecture and textile design.

✎ Where did your love for fabric and textiles come from? Do you have any upcoming Projects?

I can’t really remember when it started, but my love of fashion (which led me to study Fashion & Textiles at college) started at primary school when I first tried making clothes, and use to make fashion zines for my friends and generally drive them crazy with it!
I’m currently preparing for Thread Festival of Textiles at Farnham Maltings (26-27 September) and looking to apply for some fairs and markets on the run up to Christmas. I’m also working on some new designs and ideas for products.

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✎ Whats a typical working day for you?

I tend to spend most of my time at the computer! Up until now I’ve had three nice long working days each week, while my son has been at nursery, but he starts school in September so I’m going to have to work around that (which could be fun!). I wrote a day in the life post for my blog in July, so you can see what my days (used to) look like there! http://madebymrsm.co.uk/2014/07/28/day-in-the-life-me/.

✎ For you, whats the best part of working in the craft industry?

Having the opportunity to do something I love. I’m so grateful for this after so many years working in the City and often dreading it. I don’t love every element of what I do now (still plenty of admin, spreadsheets and the like) but it feels totally different when you’re doing it for yourself.
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✎ You’ve been featured on many blogs, recently including UK Handmade. Is there a dream collaboration or blog you’d love to work with?

My dream collaboration would probably be Liberty. I’ve already used their fabrics alongside mine in products, and I would love to be able to do more of this. A slot on their craft blog would be a dream too!

And finally, what advice would you give to someone who is starting in the creative field?  

Make sure you’re really passionate about what you do before you take the leap. It is really hard work and it can be easy to become discouraged if business is slow/things aren’t happening as quickly as you’d like. It’s also helpful if you can learn to accept rejection and not take it too personally (easier said than done!). Oh, and don’t expect to be designing and making all day, as I said, I tend to spend most of my time on the computer, and although part of my design process takes place there, most of the time I’m doing admin or writing!

Join Kate on Thursday 14th August to catch her tutorial on making a vintage fabric cushion. Feel free to check out more of Kates work on her blog or her Etsy Shop (she will be moving her shop to Folksy beginning of September)! You can also take a mooch on her Facebook, Twitter: @madebymrsm, Instagram: @madebymrsm and Pinterest

Tutorial Thursday: Getting Started with Embroidery ♥

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There is a slight change of plan this week. Emily, who shared her interview with us on Tuesday, couldn’t do a tutorial for us today due to spending some time away. However, I didn’t want to leave you lovely readers without a project.

I can’t say I thought about this project for weeks. It was definitely a last minute idea, but a sweet one at that. Also, how fitting is it, what with Great British Bake Off last night?
As Emilys interview was about her life as an embroidery artist, I thought it only appropriate to carry that theme on this week. Today, I am sharing with you how to do a simple but cute embroidery project. Some people are instantly put off embroidery as its fiddly or time consuming or ‘what do you even stitch?!’. Well, I hope after this today, you will be inspired to pick up a sewing needle, grab some thread and do some sewing!

tutorial supplies 

For this you shall need these following supplies:
Fabric
Embroidery thread (I use Anchor)
Hoop (mine is 6inch)
Needles
A design to sew onto the fabric
Pencil/fabric pen

measuring fabric

Completely lay out your fabric onto a flat surface and place your hoop in the corner. I suggest the corner as you then have the rest of your fabric to use, for other projects. You want to make sure that you have enough fabric for the hoop to work with, as when the fabric is placed in the hoop, the fabric will bunch. Always cut a little more than you think you will need. My fabric is roughly 9 x 8 inches for a 5/6 inch hoop. If unsure, always put the hoop together before you cut your fabric, to give you an idea of how much you need. Also, when you take the hoop off, you’re left with crease marks as a guideline.

tracing design

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Once your fabric is cut, grap the design you wish to use and find the right placement. This really is a ‘should it go here? or should it go there?’ step. Once you are happy, place the design under your fabric and trace. I used a pencil, as my fabric is quite thin and didn’t want it to leak through. If what you are using is nice and thick, go ahead and use a washable fabric pen!

sewing the design

When you’re ready, put your hoop in place. You want the bigger hoop to be at the top of your fabric, and the smaller hoop underneath. However, I have seen it the other way around if that works better for you.
Now, begin stitching! For a neater stitch, I find that a backstitch works best. This way you have no gaps in between the stitches and it follows your work nicely.

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As I finished sewing the delicious looking biscuits, I felt it was lacking something. So, I added some text to go with it. This is freehand, but can always trace another design.

biscuit anyone?

And ta-dah! There you have a one of a kind embroidery project! Something like this would look perfect in the kitchen as a decoration or if you know someone who has a bit of a biscuit addiction, it would make a perfect gift!

Thank you for joining me today and if you wish to see Emilys interview, you can click here. Next Tuesday, we will have Kate Marsden, who is a textile designer and fibre artist.

Until then, happy dunkin’!

Introducing: Emily Nicolet ♥

Emily Nicolet embroidery

When I first stumbled upon Emilys work, I was completely in awe (and still am!). The detail gone into her work and the stitches, are beautiful! I’m super excited to have her here with us today. Meeting people who have the same interests as you, and being able to share that joy is always an exciting moment. Emily really gives us true insight into herself, her life and work in this interview, so go grab a cuppa’, and enjoy a morning (or afternoon) read…

✎  Tell us a little bit about yourself…

My name is Emily, and I’m a student living in Scotland. I just graduated with a degree in English Language at the University of Edinburgh, and next year I’ll be doing a masters in Medieval and Renaissance Studies at the University of Glasgow! As you can imagine it’s tough to find time to do as much crafting as I like and having a dedicated ‘work room’ isn’t really possible (if only I could afford a flat with spare rooms!), but I do my best to do as much as I possibly can. When I’m not at school I’m in California with my parents, two cats, and Scottish boyfriend who we love to have come along.

Mulder, its me

✎  Where did your love of hand embroidery begin? and what inspires you for your projects?

This is an interesting question because I’ve actually had to have a hard think about this! I genuinely think that the thing that inspired me to start embroidering was that moment when you walk into a crafting supplies store, and there’s a huge wall or display of all the embroidery thread colours you could possibly imagine. It just looks so tempting! I started embroidering originally as an excuse to buy some pretty thread basically, and immediately took to it. I take inspiration for projects from all around, but specifically I always try to only embroider things that interest me. One of my favourite projects to do was an embroidery based on Scully from The X-Files, which came to me after I marathoned that show pretty hard! I also take ideas from lyrics I love; many of my nature-based pieces are inspired by Joanna Newsom songs. I’m currently working on designing a pattern based on one of my all-time favourite Simpsons jokes too that I hope will come out well.

bitches get stuff done

✎   What made you want to start your own business?

I’ve been a dedicated buyer from Etsy for many years! But I didn’t think to have my own Etsy store until I started posting what I had made on Facebook, and had friends and family telling me that they thought it was very good or that they’d like to buy it. Etsy honestly makes it so easy to start a business, so I put up a few things I’d crocheted and one embroidery and it was done. I mean, no one bought any of that stuff at first, but technically that was Fawn and Peach started! It wasn’t until I started creating more embroidery pieces that I started seeing any sales.

embroidery necklace

Whats your workspace like? Are you an organised sewer, or do you find yourself surrounded by threads and fabrics?

I’m the messiest person in the world. This sounds like it might be hyperbolic, but I don’t think it is! All of my embroidery supplies are vaguely sorted and placed into one of two massive ziploc bags. I truly need a better system, but I never have the time to implement one! One of the things I do like about embroidery though is that it’s fairly portable, so my workspace is wherever I need to be – in my bed, at my table, or even at a cafe if I’m looking for a change of scenery. I can just pack everything I need into a little pouch and go!

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✎   You’ve ventured out into the business world of handmade craft. Are there any designers or companies you dream of working or collaborating with?

There are so many designers that I would love to collaborate with that it’s hard to only mention a couple! One of my embroidery friends runs her own embroidery business called Sea of Stars, and I would love to one day be able to work on a collaborative piece with her. I also follow a lot of sewing blogs, specifically independent pattern makers, and it would be an absolute dream to maybe contribute an embroidery pattern for a pattern they release! It would be so amazing to design an embroidered motif for an adorable Tilly and the Buttons pattern.

Fawn and Peach

 And finally, Do you have any tips or advice for someone whose starting out in this industry? 

Hmm, this is a tough one. In terms of people who are just starting out and building an online presence, I’d say that the best thing you can do is really make sure to have your social networking all set up! A lot of the sales or interest in my work or blog I’ve gotten has been via people sharing things I’ve made from my Facebook page, or liking the posts I’ve made on Instagram. I know that’s quite common sense at this point, but it’s easy to let things like this slip from your mind when you’re just starting out! In terms of getting started on Etsy, reading up on how Etsy SEO (that’s search engine optimisation) works is absolutely vital – I found I was getting hardly any hits at all for months, but after tweaking my listing titles to include more keywords my daily hits doubled. Little things like this can make such a big difference, and it adds up!

If you wish to purchase any designs from Emily, you can visit her Etsy shop, Fawn and Peach. Or check out her blog, Facebook and Instagram

Tutorial Thursday: Marimekko Stool ❤︎

Marimekko stool (finished, closer)

Following up from the interview, Kirsty is sharing a beautiful DIY Stool today. I feel the flowers are definitely very prominent, what with the WW1 events happening in  London this week. So, without further a do, I pass you over to the lovely maker herself! 

I’m a little bit wary of describing this project as napkin decoupage, even though that’s exactly what it is. So many of the projects which usually employ the same technique are . . . well, not really my cup of tea. Lots of country florals, cutesy animals and the kind of finished items my partner describes as dust-catchers. If you feel the same way, I’m hoping this mid-century inspired idea might change your mind. When I found these beautiful Marimekko table napkins a couple of weeks ago, I knew I didn’t just want to keep them stashed away for the rare occasions when we have people over for dinner. My original plan was to use them to decorate a large block canvas and hang it as a piece of wall art, but then I spotted this white stool-slash-side-table in Habitat, and it was a done deal. Check out the instructions below to see how it came together.

Supplies:

Stool, table or other surface to decorate
Paper table napkins
Scissors
Iron + ironing board
Decoupage medium (e.g. Mod Podge)
Paintbrush
Craft knife
Fine sandpaper or nail file

Notes:

+ Bear in mind that as you’ll only be using the very thin top layer of the napkin, the colour of the surface beneath will show through and effect the way it looks. As a general rule, it’s best to go with white or a very pale, neutral shade. If you need to paint your surface to make this work, be sure the paint is thoroughly dry before you start.

+ Decoupage medium is a magnet for fine pieces of dust, fluff and hair. It’s SO frustrating to have to keep wiping them off your work, and even worse if you don’t notice them until it’s dry. Where possible, work over a clean, smooth surface (I used my wooden desk), keeping away from things like fans and open windows, and shut out or distract any pets until you’re finished.

How-to:

Marimekko stool (1)

1. Cut out the shapes you want to use from the napkin, leaving a very narrow border around the edge. If the background of your napkin is a contrasting colour (i.e. not white), you might find it’s more effect to cut right up to the outline.

2. Peel away the backing layers of paper so you’re just left with the top, coloured piece. Use a warm iron to smooth out any wrinkles or creases (turn off the steam setting first).

Marimekko stool (3)

3. Brush a thin layer of decoupage medium or Mod Podge onto the surface of the stool, covering an area slightly larger than your first paper shape. Place the shape on top of the adhesive, tapping it very gently into place. Dip your brush into the Mod Podge again and spread a layer over the whole of the shape, working from the centre out. The paper will retain some wrinkles, but brushing over the top helps to smooth it out and make sure it’s fully adhered to the surface.

Marimekko stool (4)

4. Add more paper shapes in the same way. I used the original print (it’s called Unikko) as a guide, but you might prefer to create your own, more random design instead. Allow the shapes to overhang when you reach the edges; the paper napkin pieces are very fragile while wet, and really prone to tearing.

TIP: If you do tear a piece as you’re working, the best thing to do is carefully remove it with a damp cloth or baby wipe before it dries, and try again.

Marimekko stool (5)

5. Once you’ve covered the whole piece, set it aside to dry, and then use a craft knife to carefully trim away excess paper from the edges. Tidy up any rough edges by gently rubbing with a fine-grit sandpaper or soft nail file.

6. To seal and protect the finished surface, brush on a couple of extra coats of decoupage medium or some clear varnish (matt or glossy, as preferred).

Marimekko stool (finished)

That’s it! Pretty straightforward, right? If you’re at all daunted by the size of the project, have a go at working on a smaller piece first. I used the same technique to decorate a couple of painted jam jars (you can find the project in Paperie). It’s a really inexpensive way to try out the idea before committing to something bigger.

I hope you might feel inspired to give your own napkin decoupage project a go, or maybe just to look at paper projects in a different way. Scrapbooking and card-making are fantastic, but the possibilities definitely don’t stop there!

And, if you want to know a bit more about Kirsty Neale herself, then take a read of the interview she did here on Tuesday 5th August. Next week, we have Emily, owner of Fawn and Peach, sharing an interview with us. You can catch Emily on Tuesday 12th August. 

Introducing: Kirsty Neale ♥

Hello card (Kirsty Neale)
Today is the start of my new series! Three weeks of every month, I shall be bringing you a variety of bloggers and designers, sharing tutorials and an interview, just for you.  To start us off this month, is the lovely, Kirsty Neale.  I had the privilege of working with Kirsty on her bestselling book “Hoop-la” and she truly is wonderful at what she does.  So, lets find out a little bit more about her… 

 ✎   Tell us a bit about yourself…

I’m a freelancewriter and designer-maker, living in London with my partner who’s a musician, and our cat, who’s not. I like stitching and making things from paper, and my second craft book, Paperie, was published last month.

✎   Where did your love for ‘all things craft’ come from? Do you have any upcoming projects?

I’ve made things for as long as I can remember. I loved drawing and my mum taught me to sew when I was five, which was the start of a pretty big love affair. At times, I’ve drifted away from more traditional types of creating, but it always sneaks out in some form. It’s often a kind of problem-solving – my brain is pretty good at working out how things are made and I sometimes find it easier to explain stuff by drawing it. If my mum had bought me Meccano, I might have ended up an engineer, but she went with a needle and thread, so craft it is!

As far as upcoming projects go, I’m currently working on a new book idea and also have some fun personal projects on the horizon. My sister and my best friend are both expecting babies in the autumn, so I’m spending lots of time on Pinterest, trying to decide what to make for them.

Perpetual calendar (Paperie _ Kirsty Neale)

✎   What’s a typical working day for you?

It really depends what I’m working on. As much as I enjoy both the writing and designing/making parts of my job, it takes a definite mind-shift to switch between the two, so I’ll try to set out my day based around one or the other. Because I work from home, I also have to fit in things like running errands and doing laundry – all the boring-but-important stuff – and then there’s keeping on top of my Inbox, too. I’d love to tell you I’m super-organised, but . . . that would be a lie. Deadlines help to keep things in line, I try to deal with emails early in the morning, and after years of working crazy-long hours, we now have a fairly strict no-work-after-supper rule. Apart from those rough guidelines, it’s very often a free for all. I’m definitely in the market for scheduling and organisation tips, if anyone wants to pass on their favourites . . .

✎    For you, what’s the best part of working in the craft industry? Do you have a particular favourite interest?

I think the best part is probably the variety. As much as I like (and have tried) the idea of selling handmade items, I tend to get bored making the same thing over and over again. Designing projects for books and magazines means I’m always working on something new. I could live to be a hundred and not make it to the end of my ideas list, but at least this way I get to make a pretty good dent in it.

As for particular interests, I love pattern and colour, whether it’s on paper or fabric – in fact, I think those things are probably why I gravitate towards paper and fabric. I like experimenting with different media, but it always comes back to those two things.

Printer's tray (Kirsty Neale)

✎  You’ve worked with many people, including Mollie Makes. Is there a dream collaboration or blog you’d love to work with?

I’ve been lucky enough to work with lots of companies and blogs I really love. The blog tour we did when Hoop-la was published last year was especially good – I drew up a list of my favourite bloggers, spent ages building up the nerve to ask if they’d like to take part, and was amazed that nearly all of them said yes. I ended up organising the whole thing halfway through writing Paperie, but their lovely, generous posts made the chaos totally worthwhile.

I don’t particularly have a dream collaboration right now, although there are still plenty of people I’d like to work with. I really enjoyed designing the patterned paper sheets which are included at the back of Paperie, so maybe something involving surface pattern design might be a fun idea for a future joint project.

✎   And finally, what advice would you give to someone who is starting in the creative field?

It’s tricky. I sort of fell into the career I have, and I think that’s true of a lot of people in creative industries right now. Blogs and online communities make it easier to get noticed and build useful relationships these days, which is obviously great. There are also some fantastic online classes around, often focussing on really niche subjects or areas, and a growing number of books on building a creative career, too.

As a basic starting point, I’d say it’s most important to just make/draw/write stuff – as much of it as you possible can. It helps to develop and hone your style, and then to keep on top of it later on. Do the opposite, too – read and study and look at stuff other people have written or made, both things you like and things you’re not so keen on. It can be just as useful to work out what you don’t like and why, as it is to take inspiration from your creative heroes. If you’re planning a creative career, it’s also useful to look at the business models of creatives you admire – find out how they make a living from their skills, and see how that might apply to you. The business part can be hard (it’s not my favourite either!), but it’s important if you want to make a real go of things.

 

Catch Kirsty here on Thursday 8th August, where she shall be sharing a tutorial with us. However, in the meantime, you can check out more of her work on her blog ‘Ginger and George’ . Also, if you wish to find out more on her books ‘Paperie’ and ‘Hoop-La: 100 ways to use embroidery hoops’, or wish to make a purchase click on this link

Thank you for joining us today and hope to see you Thursday.

 

A fresh start… ♥

Hello my lovely readers! I’m so sorry its been a while since my blog has seen some action. I can’t work out if its because life has passed me by, or life has been too busy. Either way, I’m back now and with awesome news!

For months, I’ve been desperate to create a pretty, eye catching, wonderfully inspiring blog. The first blog I ever made was on Freewebs when I was about nine (if I could call it a blog, it was more a page to share my girly obsessions! Oh wait…). Since then I have gone on a whirlwind with every blogging network possible. Luckily, WordPress has been my saving grace as I was definitely close to giving up! Also, working for someone else’s website, really gives you the blog bug! (Feel free to check out the lovely lady herself!)

So, what is this awesome news you ask? I guess its been since I last blogged, I’ve really had to think about where I want this to go and what I want to do with it. How do I make this different or my blog? Its so easy to route through other blogs and feel like yours is crap, or its terrible compared to theirs and think whats the point? Its always good to have healthy competition, but I got to the point where I thought mine would never be good enough to carry on. However, many words of encouragement from my boyfriend later, changed my way of thinking and I started to put plans into action! Why let talent go to waste right?

This is my new plan. Every month, starting in August, I will be having three guest bloggers! Two are covering specific topics, and one free reign! I shall be including my own inspiration related posts and more tutorials. Every guest blogger I feature, will have two slots. One day for an interview, the other to give us a tutorial on their chosen idea. Ideally, giving you a lovely connection!
I’m all about supporting other bloggers. The internet is a tough place, so sticking together is what I wish to do with everyone I meet and greet. If you wish to be a apart of this, please contact me here.

I don’t wish to give too much away, such as the topics and who I have planned so far, but I am really excited about where this is going and what could come of this. Fingers crossed everything goes to plan and, watch this space! Join me on August 8th with my first guest blogger. In the mean time, expect some stuff from myself.

Until then,

Happy Blogging!

 

 

 

It’s a… ♥

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Today I am doing something a little different. Today is ‘BLOG-HOP’ day! Last week, I got a lovely long email from Kirsty Neale, regarding taking part in this ‘blog-hop’.

What is a blog-hop? Well, its simply hopping around loads of different blogs every week, that have been personally invited to take part. Its such a wonderful way to get the blogging network connected, and to share such brilliant work! (Also, to meet new people and to keep blogging very much alive!) Yay for the blogging world!

You can check out the lovely lass that invited me, Kirsty Neale, on her blog Ginger And George. Kirsty has recently released a book, Hoop-La!: 100 things to do with embroidery hoops, which I had the absolute delight of working for and has an upcoming book due out in a few months time! Her work is very much ‘all things craft’ and is definitely for you if you believe in cute creatures and embroidery. You shall also find on there, her blog hop post, along with 3 other bloggers for you to check out. Its a very back & forth type thing, however I believe that adds to the fun!

I hope you have just as much fun following this round, as much as we have taking part! Below you will see the bloggers I invited, and I very much hope you will take the time to have a look, as they are all so wonderful and amazingly talented!

So, here we go…

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1. What am I Working On?

Currently, I am working on making an awesome career for myself! I can’t say I am doing some kind of HUGE project or working for a upcoming designer, because I’m simply not. (Unless, I count myself as the designer, then yes I am!)

I recently took on the challenge of making a dress, with a zip! Normally I skip all dress patterns that involve some kind of technical sewing. But, I wanted to push myself harder and thought a zip would be a good way to go… Can I get the zip in right? Of course not! Nevertheless, I shall not be defeated.

In September I shall be attending Bridalwear Summer School. My next, massive step into becoming a freelance Dressmaker! Until then, I shall be constantly working on my sketchbook and getting as much inspiration for my collections.

Over the last few months, I have done work for some really wicked people and I love that I’m constantly talking to new people from all over the world. You can look out for an article I did in the latest issue of ‘Mollie Makes’ magazine and please check out my previous work on www.shimelle.com.

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2.  How does my work differ from others of its genre? 

I always try to make my work stand out from the others out there. I always try to produce a unique creative solution; depending on the project. I constantly push myself to learn new skills so everything I do has my own touch on it.

I rarely settle on one style of work. I think thats what makes me stand out a little, every project I do, I do differently! Whether it be the photography/the style… I don’t see the point of sticking to one way of doing things as after a while, you get bored of it yourself – and thats not what you want!!

Over the last year, I have had the best teacher showing me the ways of the internet world! As well as showing me that you can do what you love, she’s taught me too learn as much as I want, teach as much as I can and proudly show it off however I wish!

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3. Why do I write/create what I do?

The same reason as anyone else who does something they love. I love doing it! I love everything about it. The process, the creating, the creation, the feeling of achievement and it getting recognised. The sharing part is definitely one of my favourites as you get a sense of pride and am like ‘yes! I made that!’.
Everything I make, I do because I want to. I may of seen it elsewhere and wish to re-create it or an idea pops into my head and I then turn it into something physical. Enjoyment definitely plays a massive part!

I’ve always know that THIS is what I want to do with my life. Being creative, hands on, bringing handmade goodness back to light, showing everyone that you don’t have to have a boring job to make a living! Whatever your dream job may be, make it happen.

The whole reason for doing this today, is not only to introduce you to my blog, but to show you other bloggers that I love and want to share! So, enough chatter now and I leave you with these three darling people.

imageAbigail Beach is a student studying at Durham University. She used to be a paper scrapbooker but with the demands of a student life and budget she has turned to digital memory keeping. She loves documenting the everyday, rejoicing in the ordinary and trying out all sorts of crafts. She writes about this at Creating Paper Dreams. You can also find her on Instagram as @abibeach.

image Anna Fazakerley is dotty about crochet, jewellery making, sewing and more. She love to design and crafting is an extension of that. Anna is constantly adding to her list of things to make and learn. Blogging about crafty life is a great way to document the journey to look back on. You can check out her blog, Dotty Doily & follow her on twitter.

image Lindsey Portas lives and grew up in Essex with her family and creates her work in her extremely cluttered bedroom. She studied BA (Hons) Printed Textile Design at the University of East London and is graduating in November. She now hopes to find a job within the printed textile design industry whether it specialises in digital print design or screen printed design. Please check out Lindsey’s website where you can find her blog, twitter and pinterest.

You can see their ‘blog-hop’ posts on Monday 9th June. Make sure not to miss out! 

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Tutorial Tuesday: Summer Bunting! ♥

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Summer is on its way with a heatwave this weekend! So, whats the best way to make the most of the sun? Garden parties, BBQ’s and good ole’ fun! Today, I’m going to show you how to create a simple bunting to give your garden that summer pick me up!

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For this you shall need as many fabrics as you wish! (A perfect way of using up scrap fabrics). Ribbon or lace to place your triangles on and a bunting template.

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Place your template on fold of your fabric, and pin. By placing the template on the fold, when you cut you shall get a lovely folded triangle, which you will need to keep it in place once hanged.

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Cut carefully around your template.
Do this step and the previous for all your fabrics. You can cut using straight scissors of funk it up a bit by using patterned shears! Give it a bump effect or a pointy effect!

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Once you have cut all your triangles, you need to start putting your ribbon/lace in the middle of each triangle. Be sure to measure the space in between each triangle to get a even finish. Pin down the ribbon.

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Time to start sewing! Simply start from the top of the edge of the triangle and sew round. Do this for each of your triangles and they will all be safely kept in place.

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And there you have a beautiful bunting, perfect for all your garden occasions and looking wonderful in the sunshine!

If you wanted to personalise, you could add letters to each bunting, creating a name or word. You could embellish it a bit more with pegs and hang photos/decorations off of it or for the night time, wrap little fairy lights around it – giving your garden a summery glow!